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Posts Tagged ‘goal setting’

Today marks the 1,001st day of the 101-in-1001 challenge that Bart and I started back in February of 2011. Our goal was to create a list of 101 things to do in 1001 days–just about 2.75 years–and accomplish all of them in the given time. As of today, I count that we accomplished 88 out of 101 items on our list, meaning 13 items were not completed by this date.
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Everyone has a mental list of things they’d like to do someday, be it travel or crafts, classes to take or chores they’ve been putting off, foods to try or places to go. So often these ideas and dreams fall by the wayside, lost in the tyranny of the urgent–the daily grind, small annoyances with loud voices, general lack of motivation.

This was definitely happening to Bart and me as I was plodding through grad school and we had our normal routine going. But one day I read about a project called the “101 in 1001:” a list of 101 things to do in 1001 days, just over 2.75 years. The idea is to pick a variety of things you would like to do and set a time goal to have them all completed by. The length, not quite three years, accommodates many shorter term projects as well as some that might require more time to accomplish. The idea appealed to us as a way to motivate ourselves to do those things that we always said we ought to do. Thus, in February of 2011, our 101-in-1001 list was born. Our 1001 days will end on November 14, 2013.

We’ve been at it nearly two and a half years now and have made significant progress, but the move has kind of messed up our list. We had a bunch of local Denver things on the list and a number of travel items in the western US; we completed most of the Colorado items when it looked like we might move, but we didn’t quite make all the western destinations like the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone. Rather than toss out all our progress, we decided to bend the rules a little in keeping with the spirit of the list. Some of the local goals we modified to fit the time we had (go to a concert at Red Rocks Amphitheater -> go walk around Red Rocks Amphitheater). Some that we couldn’t do we replaced with interesting stuff we did do, especially if it was something we would have probably put on our list if we’d known about it earlier (go to Denver mint -> visit mint room at Celestial Seasonings factory). Likewise, we felt it was reasonable to replace some of the travel goals with similar destinations on the east coast (Grand Canyon -> Niagara Falls).

Moving also messed up our list because we aren’t in a position to do some of the projects we originally planned. For instance, I’m not set up very well in our rent house to do much sewing, so “sewing an article of clothing” probably isn’t happening for me before November. Similarly, Bart won’t be able to “turn a bowl on the lathe” as he sold that tool before we moved. Other woodworking projects will be challenging for him to complete in our limited workshop space. We decided to substitute these goals with some reasonable alternatives, though not necessarily crafty in nature.

After returning from our Fourth of July trip, Bart and I spent some time going over our list to make some of these new updates, particularly in light of our recent travel. We took a good look at what was left and made substitutions for things we knew wouldn’t be possible before November.

As of this evening, I count 20 goals still left. Looking at the remaining items, I feel re-energized to tackle some of them, but I’ll be honest that there are a couple on there that just don’t really interest me anymore. I still might be able to make myself check some them off, though. We realize that we might not meet all 101 goals by the end. There’s really no penalty for falling short; we prefer to adopt the philosophy that the list is a tool to help us accomplish things we probably wouldn’t have done without a gentle kick in the pants. We’ll just celebrate what we get done and think about new goals we want to set in the future. Maybe another 101 in 1001 list? I suppose we’ll see, but let’s not put our cart before the horse just yet.

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